Posts tagged: Science Fair

Water Quality

By , August 26, 2012

Miner’s Lake outside Ely. Sulfide level 21

Lake Superior south shore. Sulfide level 0

Wherever we traveled students took water samples to track the health of the water. Based on our continued study of the St. Louis River watershed through River Watch activities. Tests were conducted to determine dissolved oxygen, pH, nitrates, phosphates, and biochemical oxygen demand.

Miner’s Lake when it was an active mine supplied  WWI  and WWII with iron ore. Currently the pit is about 140 feet deep. Water naturally filled the hole in once the mining was done. Today it is a great fishing lake.

 

Signs of a Chemical Reaction

By , February 5, 2012

Students worked with a number of “reactants” which when put together created a “product”. Our reactant options included cabbage juice, citric acid, calcium chloride (CaCl2), baking soda or water. Everyone got to pick what they wanted to mix together. Mixtures could use only two reactants up to all five.  Students worked in groups of two – one gidaa student with one college student. Groups were able to complete up to ten experiments. It was really fun.

Baking soda and cabbage juice was the most curious combination for Chelsey. “It turned green! (and smelled bad)”. She added CaCl2 to the mixture and it created massive foam and turned from green to pink right away.

Gye put baking soda, citric acid and CaCl2 together and it made a white foam that got thicker over time. It had chunky white spots with cold and warm in different parts. It was really fun.

Snow Snakes

By , March 2, 2011

  Snow snakes are a traditional game that has been played by many generations wherever there is snow. Today competitions take place as far north as the Arctic Games. Local games have sprung up annually in Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin. gidakiimanaaniwigamig students worked to carve their own snow snake during the winter months of camp. They tested the velocity (and friction) their snake produced by pushing it into a track with a per-determined weight attached to a swinging arm.

Traditional games are not only used for gathering people together but to teach a skill needed for survival. Throwing the snow snakes sharpened skills for hunting and spearing as it taught patience, focus and team work. Students used traditional Mora carving knives as well as  tools to carve wild rice knockers to form their snow snakes. A light coat of polyurethane (and some suggest ski wax) will help the snake fly down the snow track.

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