Posts tagged: phytolith

Students design T-shirts as they continue their study with LacCore

By , February 3, 2013

redshirtwlogoFrontMacrofossilgreenshirtFront copydiatom2Tshirtdesign_blackshirtFrontFINAL copyStudents continued their study of Bang Lake’s macrofossils, phytoliths and diatoms. Identyfication with continued clarification by LacCore scientists is building on a becoming familiar with the different terms through hands on learning.

T-shirt designs were created by each group. Groups will share what they each learn to the entire group weekly. A large poster of the Bang Lake core is being developed which will include not only what each group finds in their core but the oral tradition and stories of events at or near Bang Lake.

Coring Bang Lake

By , November 25, 2012

This years study of manoomin will be based in the core and samples collected during November’s camp. Students observed LacCore/Natural Resources scientists as they collected two cores and  live diatoms (water) from the edge of Bang Lake.

It was an unusually warm Fall day. The sky was a mixture of overcast and sunshine. Even though the lake had frozen over, the thin ice kept students close to shore as they completed their work of gathering and bagging seeds and vegetation samples. By completing a number of prepared questions students were directed in their observation,  research and ID of trees and plants (macrofossils).  Students collected information in a variety of ways – for example, written description a species of trees, bush and grasses were identified by their GPS location, seeds collected and bagged, plant samples collected and bagged, sun-prints, drawings, and digital photographs.

 

 

Phytoliths

By , March 12, 2012

The study of phytoliths in clay pots became more understandable as students made their own clay coil pots with white earthenware clay, bisque fired them and then completed a final firing at the campfire during camp. Other exploration to assist students in identifying phytoliths under the microscope were also done using oil based clay and drawing.  We hope to cook in the pots during 2013 camp.

Phytoliths and Campfires

By , February 6, 2012

Nightly campfire during our third year of study with LacCore has provided opportunity to walk through the process of making a clay pot, firing it, and hopefully using it as a utilitarian piece of pottery. Clay is one of the art  forms that lasts overtime allowing years of use by the maker as well as a wealth f information to scientists later on.

Cone-shaped sandy paste vessel from a Mossy Grove site in Polk County, Texas. Whole Mossy Grove pots are rare. TARL archives.

They tried to form there pots in the traditional cone shape. Pots were then bisque fired to cone 06 and then returned to the next camp where the pots were fired in the campfire. The smoke and wood ash  created beautiful greys and blacks in the clay. Olive oil was brushed into the hot pots curing the clay. Curing the ceramics we hope will keep food from sticking to the clay.

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