Posts tagged: Invasive Species

niibin 2012 – Bad River to Bois Forte

By , August 26, 2012

Students visited Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC- Odanah, WI) to learn more about Ojibwe language and culture, current tribal management of the water and land uses and reacquaint and reestablish ourselves as needed concerning our treaty rights as Indian people to hunt and gather.

 

It was a week of connecting what we know about the areas in Minnesota, North and South Dakota, Wisconsin and Michigan where Ojibwe people have lived for generations. We added to our knowledge by traveling southeast to the Bad River Reservation in Odanah, WI and as far north as the Bois Forte Reservation in northern Minnesota. Between the bus rides students studied the geology of the land, collected water samples for testing, swam in lakes, read books, wrote reflections/took notes and enjoyed each other as family and friends.

At the Bois Forte Museum students walked through displays describing  the history of the Ojibwe people traveling east to the place where the wild rice grew. Government boarding schools and traditional life clashed bringing with it continued years of struggle for generations to follow. Loss of language and culture, family groups broken and a lack of understanding between peoples concerning land and water use contributed to our current state and the established reservation system of government. Elders spoke about what we have been through and encouraged the young people to become knowledgeable to carry on.

“Indians lives in family groups and villages. We were not identified by a particular place and never imagined that land could belong to individuals. When the settlers arrived the government gave us names according to where our villages happened to be. They put us on reservations, forbade out traditions and ignored our reverence for the land.

I like to describe the Ojibwe and Fur Trade partnership as an  “economic cooperation”. Indians became part of the newly created global industrial  economy as producers, consumers, and traders. They were participants in that world even before many Europeans.” 
~Carl Gawboy, Bois Forte Band of Ojibwe

Macroinvertebrate Tag

By , February 4, 2012

Students spent time learning about the transparency water and dissolved oxygen in specific areas (Hwy 11, Hwy 7, Jay Cock and Chambers Grove). Each place a specific level that told them if the water was healthy or not. All spots checked were very good.

Water samples were taken and invertebrates were counted. Over time the invertebrates that were tolerate to pollutants grew in number. That’s bad. The invertebrates that were sensitive to pollution started to die off – also bad.

Each student was then ID as either a stone fly, caddis fly, mayfly, a scud, or a blood worm. Students lined up and on the mark “go” ran from one side to the other side of the field. The person who was “it” who represented pollution. If they tagged one of the invertebrates  the invertebrate became a “bloodworm”. A bloodworm is a symbol of polluted waters. It took only three or four runs across the field to shake out the “waters” showing how the pollution grows fast and leaves a negative impact.

Panorama Theme by Themocracy