Category: manoomin

Wild Rice Camp

By , September 16, 2013
manoomin camp Sept 2013

manoomin camp Sept 2013

Photos from camp

Students gathered wild rice in groups at local state lake most of Saturday and Sunday. Local elders shared “how to” tips and enjoyed gathering rice with manoomin students. A wild rice camp was set up at Perch Lake. Jim Northrum Jr. shared his stories and technical information of how Ojibwe people have gathered and prepared wild rice gained from his relatives talking with him as a young one and his experiences as an adult.

April manoomin Studies Water and Presents Posters

By , April 21, 2013
Students and teacher, Mentors and Scientists Meet at April manoomin Camp

Students and teacher, Mentors and Scientists Meet at April manoomin Camp

The study of water is important for all of us. 13 Moons and the manoomin project joined together today to learn more about water quality issues as well as present manoomin and science fair student posters.

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The day began with a water blessing  and song. Speakers included Nancy Schuldt from FDLRM. She spoke about the water quality issues and projects happening on the reservation. She will be heading out to Washington DC to discuss further the FDL impact studies on water quality as it pertains to the mining in northern MN as well as the health of the St. Louis River Watershed. She commended the students on their work and includes the information gathered in her presentations.

We also heard from tribal group from Louisiana that will talk about the water quality issues they are experiencing in the Gulf in particular since the Katrina and the bp oil spill. They also talked about the loss of land as it pertains to global warming and the sea water rise. Considerable study is on going.

manoomin and 2013 science fair students presented their posters to the public. Community members asked questions of the students. It is a good way to demonstrate what we have learned this past year as well as consider what we need to study in the future. Raffles were held all afternoon to encourage students and the public to talk. Students gave anyone who asked them a question a raffle ticket.

IMG_3136IMG_3128IMG_3120Engineering college mentors, Wayne and AJ, designed an engineering challenge. Our goal was to construct a tower made of raw spaghetti noodles and marshmallows.  The design of the tower was to provide the  tallest, strongest and best designed -best looking tower.  Everyone participated and did well! It was a great day for all.

 

 

 

Macrofossil Poster

By , March 14, 2013
Macrofossils of Bang Lake in Carlton County

Macrofossils of Bang Lake in Carlton County

Diatom Poster

By , March 14, 2013
Diatom Poster

Diatom Poster

Phytolith Posters

By , March 14, 2013
Phytolith Poster

Phytolith Poster

Students design T-shirts as they continue their study with LacCore

By , February 3, 2013

redshirtwlogoFrontMacrofossilgreenshirtFront copydiatom2Tshirtdesign_blackshirtFrontFINAL copyStudents continued their study of Bang Lake’s macrofossils, phytoliths and diatoms. Identyfication with continued clarification by LacCore scientists is building on a becoming familiar with the different terms through hands on learning.

T-shirt designs were created by each group. Groups will share what they each learn to the entire group weekly. A large poster of the Bang Lake core is being developed which will include not only what each group finds in their core but the oral tradition and stories of events at or near Bang Lake.

Giving to our Community

By , February 3, 2013

IMG_0133IMG_0041IMG_0109IMG_0134IMG_0210Considering our community and being actively involved in keeping it healthy anchored manoomin in January 2013. Friday night’s first activity was making birdhouses for our elders. Students worked in small groups constructing houses to be given out. Wood burned designs personalized the houses.

Saturday afternoon thru the early evening students served food at the 13 Moons Pow Wow at the Black Bear Casino. It is estimated nearly 1,000 people were served. Elders were brought a plate by the young people.

Service to our community is an important part of gidakiimanaaniwigamig.

Gathering Stories of Bang Lake

By , November 25, 2012

 

1916 Bang Lake

Through the core a record of our history can be observed. Our study began on Friday night as Tom Howes, FDL Natural Resources introduced Bang Lake.  He shared data collected by Fond du Lac elders about the wild rice harvest back many years. We also looked at maps of the Fond du lac Reservation beginning in 1916 that demonstrated significate changes in the landscape.

Students began their own observations Saturday afternoon by cutting open the core collected that morning and making thier own observations. The two cores were noticeably different – one more dense than the other. Lowana Greensky led students through a discussion on the dating of core beginning in 1500/bottom of our core to 2012/present-top of our core.  Significant dates in history were identified along the length of the core – 1492 Columbus reaches North America;  1787 -1803 Northwest Territory; 1803 Louisiana Purchase; 1837 Michigan became a state; 1836, 1837,  1842, and 1854 Treaties between the United States and the Ojibwe bands in which  they ceded lands in northern Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota but retained the  right to hunt, fish and gather on he lands they sold; 1848 Wisconsin becomes a state; 1858 Minnesota becomes a state;  1861–65 Civil War; and  1924 The Indian Citizenship Act.

Later that afternoon Louis Wise talked about growing up near Bang Lake on Perch Lake. Educated as a biologist Mr. Wise has worked with the DNR and FDL Natural Resources. He explained the role beavers and muskrats played in the wild rice. He told stories about his Grandma controlling the water level by opening and closing the damn. He told stories about sitting on his Dad’s shoulders and seeing nearly 400 muskrat houses on Perch Lake.

He descibed how wild rice needs abrupt oxygen, temperature and nutritional changes to grow. The water levels had to be brought down in January creating an open space below the ice/above the water. Come April the ice break up and drop down, creating waves (open water), allowing oxygen into the water earlier than other lakes. Also, because the water level was tended to be lower the sun would then  could reach the bottom, warming the seeds creating a temperature change. The seeds could then germinate.

Many discussion and review of all we had heard was had between student and staff alike. We hope to continue the discussion during each gathering to better understand our history with wild rice.

Coring Bang Lake

By , November 25, 2012

This years study of manoomin will be based in the core and samples collected during November’s camp. Students observed LacCore/Natural Resources scientists as they collected two cores and  live diatoms (water) from the edge of Bang Lake.

It was an unusually warm Fall day. The sky was a mixture of overcast and sunshine. Even though the lake had frozen over, the thin ice kept students close to shore as they completed their work of gathering and bagging seeds and vegetation samples. By completing a number of prepared questions students were directed in their observation,  research and ID of trees and plants (macrofossils).  Students collected information in a variety of ways – for example, written description a species of trees, bush and grasses were identified by their GPS location, seeds collected and bagged, plant samples collected and bagged, sun-prints, drawings, and digital photographs.

 

 

Bad River Fishery

By , August 26, 2012

Release Tanks at Fishery, Bad River Reservation, Odanah, WI

About 2,000 Coastal Brook Trout are raised from eggs and released when a year old into rivers and streams.

The health of our water and land was part of each lesson and activity. While visiting in Odanah we toured the reservations fishery. The fishery raises Walleye and Coastal Brook Trout from eggs for up to 7 years and then releases them. Each tank held a specific species and age of fish.

Lake Superior shore near Ashland

We also spent time swimming in Lake Superior. As expected it was cold and refreshing.

 

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