Category: gidakiimanaaniwigamig

Summer 2014

By , July 13, 2014

IMG_6432Our final camp in our study of manoomin was a transitional time. Most of the original students and mentors had moved on allowing new students to join gidakiimanaaniwigamig teachers and staff. Throughout the week students participated in hands on learning, group work skills, individual skills and writing. We travelled to UMD where we took a guided nature walk through the Bagley nature Center as well as climbed the large indoor rock wall.

The highlight of the week was when we travelled to GLIFWC/Odanah and then the Madeline Island. We were reminded of our connection to and the importance of Madeline Island.

“According to the teachings of the Anishinaabe people it was the sacred Megis Shell that first guided the people to the rich regions of the Great Lakes. The Megis Shell was last seen near Madeline Island, which was one of the settling points for the tribal people migrating from the eastern shores of the continent.

The Anishinaabe were semi-nomadic people living in small bands. They followed seasonal paths to traditional hunting, fishing, and gathering grounds where they harvested deer, game, fish, maple sugar, berries, and wild rice. Lake Superior, or Gitchi (big) Gummi (water), and the surrounding land were bountiful sources of food. Lake Superior’s waters yielded lake trout, whitefish and sturgeon. It is no wonder that several bands established villages on the shores of the lake in Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Canada. Gitchi Gummi was a bountiful source of food. (GLIFWC also supports a local fishery, visited previously by gida students. This fishery not only sells fish commercially but the waste product as organic plant food.)

As Europeans pushed into the Great Lakes region, the Anishinaabe people used fish to trade with French and
English outposts. Fish soon became one of the mainstays in the diets of the early fur traders. In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s Lake Superior’s fishery faced a growing number of non-Indian commercial fishermen who used new technology to efficiently take fish from Lake Superior in large numbers.” (http://www.glifwc.org/publications/pdf/LakeSuperiorIndianFishery.pdf)

IMG_6472IMG_6549Students were reminded of their history and encouraged to journal not only their new knowledge but discuss their concerns and ideas related to topics presented such as sulfide mining, the Sandy Lake Tragedy, treaty rights and education.

They worked in multi-age small groups on building (and flying!) rockets. They designed Ojibwe symmetrical glyphs for the journal covers and wrote in their journals through out the week. teachers/college mentors read each students journals and wrote back.

Considerable time was spent studying the water quality found in the St. Louis River at Jay Cooke State Park. “RiverWatch” water study activities taught students how to accurately collect water samples, look for bugs and identify them – specific bugs signify the health of the water. Students drew the bugs to better understand them.

A geology study of the rocks found along the St. Louis also provided students with a better understanding of our land. Keys were used to determine the rocks found. Students again were able to work individually as well as in small groups.

We visited Duluth’s Barnes & Nobles where students each chose a book to be purchased for them to read during our many “road trips” and before “lightsout”/bedtime.

IMG_6611IMG_6616The culmination of the week were groups presentations on the weeks activities given to family. Each student prepared statements based on their writing and participation. The program was excellent!

We had a wonderful time getting to know each other better as well as make new friends from across the area. We look forward to seeing each other again in September!

Wild Rice Camp

By , September 16, 2013
manoomin camp Sept 2013

manoomin camp Sept 2013

Photos from camp

Students gathered wild rice in groups at local state lake most of Saturday and Sunday. Local elders shared “how to” tips and enjoyed gathering rice with manoomin students. A wild rice camp was set up at Perch Lake. Jim Northrum Jr. shared his stories and technical information of how Ojibwe people have gathered and prepared wild rice gained from his relatives talking with him as a young one and his experiences as an adult.

Coring Cupcakes

By , February 16, 2013

IMG_9697IMG_9714IMG_9702Now in our third year of the manoomin project a number of new students have joined the study. To help all of us remember what we have accomplished as a group we talked through the process of coring and studying the lakes. Through pictures and coring cupcakes seasoned manoomin students shared what they knew of the process, equipment and purpose in collection of the lake cores on the Fond du Lac Reservation.

Students design T-shirts as they continue their study with LacCore

By , February 3, 2013

redshirtwlogoFrontMacrofossilgreenshirtFront copydiatom2Tshirtdesign_blackshirtFrontFINAL copyStudents continued their study of Bang Lake’s macrofossils, phytoliths and diatoms. Identyfication with continued clarification by LacCore scientists is building on a becoming familiar with the different terms through hands on learning.

T-shirt designs were created by each group. Groups will share what they each learn to the entire group weekly. A large poster of the Bang Lake core is being developed which will include not only what each group finds in their core but the oral tradition and stories of events at or near Bang Lake.

Giving to our Community

By , February 3, 2013

IMG_0133IMG_0041IMG_0109IMG_0134IMG_0210Considering our community and being actively involved in keeping it healthy anchored manoomin in January 2013. Friday night’s first activity was making birdhouses for our elders. Students worked in small groups constructing houses to be given out. Wood burned designs personalized the houses.

Saturday afternoon thru the early evening students served food at the 13 Moons Pow Wow at the Black Bear Casino. It is estimated nearly 1,000 people were served. Elders were brought a plate by the young people.

Service to our community is an important part of gidakiimanaaniwigamig.

Water Quality

By , August 26, 2012

Miner’s Lake outside Ely. Sulfide level 21

Lake Superior south shore. Sulfide level 0

Wherever we traveled students took water samples to track the health of the water. Based on our continued study of the St. Louis River watershed through River Watch activities. Tests were conducted to determine dissolved oxygen, pH, nitrates, phosphates, and biochemical oxygen demand.

Miner’s Lake when it was an active mine supplied  WWI  and WWII with iron ore. Currently the pit is about 140 feet deep. Water naturally filled the hole in once the mining was done. Today it is a great fishing lake.

 

biboon 2012

By , March 11, 2012

Camp participants

biboon 2012 Winter  January through March camps were spent preparing to tell the story of this year’s study of manoomin. LacCore and manoomin worked together to complete three poster which will be presented mid-March in Montana at the Geo-Science Alliance as well as in April to the Fond du Lac Reservation leaders.

Continued study in the FDLTCC lab with LacCore scientists and grad students involving macro-fossils, phytoliths and diatoms. University students worked with manoomin students working on paper engineering 3D constructions and wind power studies.

gichi-manidoo-giizis manoomin 2011

By , January 26, 2011

gichi-manidoo-giizis 2011 Great Spirit Moon (January) camp began at the Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College with a Feast and Ceremony. Year two brings new challenges to the group as we study the wild rice lakes’ past, present and future.  Lake Team 4 spent most of the day Saturday on Mud Lake while Lake Team 5 and 6  worked in small groups carving snow snakes, water table study and studying fluid dynamics. Student wrote about what they learned and were interested in studying.

Jobs to think about…..

By , August 3, 2010

Does your work in the manoomin project encourage you to look towards a job in Natural Resources (Natural Resource folks watch over the earth, water and air for a healthy future. See FDL Natural Resources site by clicking here.

gimikwenden ina?

By , July 12, 2010

manoomin-oct2013 072
Boozhoo!
What memories do you remember about wild ricing? What do you know about wild rice history on the Fond du lac Reservation? If you are willing to share your stories students involved with the manoomin project are interested to listen.

There are lots of ways to let us know what you are thinking about – click on the “comment” link found on this site, contact one of the students or teachers (see link to teachers) via email, call Holly Pellerin at 218-879-0757 or send a letter to Holly Pellerin at the Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College at 1201 14th St. Cloquet, MN 55720.   ~miigwech

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