Bad River Fishery

By , August 26, 2012

Release Tanks at Fishery, Bad River Reservation, Odanah, WI

About 2,000 Coastal Brook Trout are raised from eggs and released when a year old into rivers and streams.

The health of our water and land was part of each lesson and activity. While visiting in Odanah we toured the reservations fishery. The fishery raises Walleye and Coastal Brook Trout from eggs for up to 7 years and then releases them. Each tank held a specific species and age of fish.

Lake Superior shore near Ashland

We also spent time swimming in Lake Superior. As expected it was cold and refreshing.

 

Wing Young Huie “Chalk Talk” Photography

By , August 26, 2012

Our first night together we looked at the work of Wing Young Huie. Mr. Huie , born in Duluth currently lives and works in the Twin Cities as a photographer. He has spent a considerable amount of time asking himself the very questions we asked ourselves through this activity. Based on the University Ave Project in Minneapolis Huie’s photographs confront many divisive social issues, such as cultural bias, immigration, religion, and social disconnection.

Contrasting points of views are engaged when viewing Huie’s  photographs demonstrating how what we perceive to be true may be open to interpretation.  By asking “What do you see?” a dialogue is facilitated before revealing the stories behind the photographs. Participating in activities such as this in a safe environment such as camp allows deeper discussion into the complexities of cultural and personal perceptions.

How are we impacted by the daily consumption of countless images created by marketing forces, the media, and popular entertainment? How can we differentiate our authentic selves from idealized realities? Do we become what we see? In other words: How do photographs form us?

Huie’s photographs allowed students to better see and understand their own perceptions of themselves as well as of  others. Through participation in the “Chalk Talk” lesson Huie developed for his own photography work along University Ave in Minneapolis students interviewed each other. Choosing another manoomin student they may not have known too well students asked open ended questions provided and interviewed each other.  They asked the  following questions:

1 Describe you life in one word.
2.What advise would you give to a stranger new to the area?
3.What is your favorite word?
4. How do you think other see you? What don’t they see?
5. How has race affected you?
6. Describe an incident that changed you.
7. What are the hopes and fears of a person your age?

It proved to be a welcomed activity, uncomfortable at times but good for us to do together.

niibin 2012 – Bad River to Bois Forte

By , August 26, 2012

Students visited Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC- Odanah, WI) to learn more about Ojibwe language and culture, current tribal management of the water and land uses and reacquaint and reestablish ourselves as needed concerning our treaty rights as Indian people to hunt and gather.

 

It was a week of connecting what we know about the areas in Minnesota, North and South Dakota, Wisconsin and Michigan where Ojibwe people have lived for generations. We added to our knowledge by traveling southeast to the Bad River Reservation in Odanah, WI and as far north as the Bois Forte Reservation in northern Minnesota. Between the bus rides students studied the geology of the land, collected water samples for testing, swam in lakes, read books, wrote reflections/took notes and enjoyed each other as family and friends.

At the Bois Forte Museum students walked through displays describing  the history of the Ojibwe people traveling east to the place where the wild rice grew. Government boarding schools and traditional life clashed bringing with it continued years of struggle for generations to follow. Loss of language and culture, family groups broken and a lack of understanding between peoples concerning land and water use contributed to our current state and the established reservation system of government. Elders spoke about what we have been through and encouraged the young people to become knowledgeable to carry on.

“Indians lives in family groups and villages. We were not identified by a particular place and never imagined that land could belong to individuals. When the settlers arrived the government gave us names according to where our villages happened to be. They put us on reservations, forbade out traditions and ignored our reverence for the land.

I like to describe the Ojibwe and Fur Trade partnership as an  “economic cooperation”. Indians became part of the newly created global industrial  economy as producers, consumers, and traders. They were participants in that world even before many Europeans.” 
~Carl Gawboy, Bois Forte Band of Ojibwe

By , August 26, 2012

manoominlogo_1inchdagwaagin2012 Our study of the past, present and future of wild rice on the Fond du Lac Reservation continues into year 4. Fond du Lac Natural Resources and the University of Minnesota LacCore continue as partners with gidakiimanaaniwigamig and area schools in Cloquet Public Schools, St. Louis County Public School District, Greenway Public Schools and Duluth Public Schools to better understand and our watershed and land use.

~miigwech to Charlie Nahgahnub for the logo design

Phytoliths

By , March 12, 2012

The study of phytoliths in clay pots became more understandable as students made their own clay coil pots with white earthenware clay, bisque fired them and then completed a final firing at the campfire during camp. Other exploration to assist students in identifying phytoliths under the microscope were also done using oil based clay and drawing.  We hope to cook in the pots during 2013 camp.

Macrofossils

By , March 12, 2012

  Students worked at FDLTCC lab with LacCore and manoomin teachers  to determine the macro-fossils found in Band Lake. Their poster was presented in Montana at the Geo-Science Alliance Conference and to the leadership on the Fond Du Lac Reservation.

biboon 2012

By , March 11, 2012

Camp participants

biboon 2012 Winter  January through March camps were spent preparing to tell the story of this year’s study of manoomin. LacCore and manoomin worked together to complete three poster which will be presented mid-March in Montana at the Geo-Science Alliance as well as in April to the Fond du Lac Reservation leaders.

Continued study in the FDLTCC lab with LacCore scientists and grad students involving macro-fossils, phytoliths and diatoms. University students worked with manoomin students working on paper engineering 3D constructions and wind power studies.

Phytoliths and Campfires

By , February 6, 2012

Nightly campfire during our third year of study with LacCore has provided opportunity to walk through the process of making a clay pot, firing it, and hopefully using it as a utilitarian piece of pottery. Clay is one of the art  forms that lasts overtime allowing years of use by the maker as well as a wealth f information to scientists later on.

Cone-shaped sandy paste vessel from a Mossy Grove site in Polk County, Texas. Whole Mossy Grove pots are rare. TARL archives.

They tried to form there pots in the traditional cone shape. Pots were then bisque fired to cone 06 and then returned to the next camp where the pots were fired in the campfire. The smoke and wood ash  created beautiful greys and blacks in the clay. Olive oil was brushed into the hot pots curing the clay. Curing the ceramics we hope will keep food from sticking to the clay.

Signs of a Chemical Reaction

By , February 5, 2012

Students worked with a number of “reactants” which when put together created a “product”. Our reactant options included cabbage juice, citric acid, calcium chloride (CaCl2), baking soda or water. Everyone got to pick what they wanted to mix together. Mixtures could use only two reactants up to all five.  Students worked in groups of two – one gidaa student with one college student. Groups were able to complete up to ten experiments. It was really fun.

Baking soda and cabbage juice was the most curious combination for Chelsey. “It turned green! (and smelled bad)”. She added CaCl2 to the mixture and it created massive foam and turned from green to pink right away.

Gye put baking soda, citric acid and CaCl2 together and it made a white foam that got thicker over time. It had chunky white spots with cold and warm in different parts. It was really fun.

Geo Cashing in Ojibwe

By , February 5, 2012

Students participated in geo cashing! Teachers prepared a course in the woods outside at the Cloquet Forestry using GPS coordinates. Students had to decipher the Ojibwe math problem to find the correct coordinates to ultimately find the hidden prize.

James liked the running around with Patrick. James Paunu enjoyed the challenge of using the GPS itself. Even though it was difficult, being out in the winter night sky was great. Bob was firing the clay pots in the fire (curing with olive oil) in hopes of getting them ready to cook wild rice in them next camp.
Ojibwe Numbers

1 = bezhig
2 = niizh
3 = niswi
5 = niiwin
5 = naanan
6 = ingodwaaswi
7 = niizhwaaswi
8 = ishwaaswi
9 = zhaangaswi
10 – midaaswi
11-19 Examples:

16 = ashi  ingodwaaswi                        16 = and (ten)  six

15 = ashi  naanan                                  15 = and (ten)  five

Numbers 201-219, 301-319, etc. Examples:
201 = niizhwaak  bezhig                     201 = number root two hundred    one

513  = naanwaak   ashi   niswi           513 = number root five   hundred  and (ten)  three

Numbers 220-299, 320-399, etc. Examples:
231 = niizhwaak  nisimidana   ashi   bezhig
213 = number root two hundred    number root three  tens  and  one

487 – niiwaak  ishwaasimidana  ashi  niizhwaaswi
487 = number root four  hundred  number root eight  tens and seven

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